the doctor is in.

ibmsocialbiz:

Seeking innovation? Look for the intersection of physical and digital worlds.

Take, for example, Tesco supermarkets in South Korea.  The company wanted to increase sales without creating more stores.  Tesco understood that Koreans work long hours and have little appetite for shopping at the end of the day so they created virtual grocery stores at subway stations.  These virtual stores, shelves and all, are projected on the walls of subway stations.  To purchase items, shoppers simply go to a Tesco app on a smartphone and scan the projected items’ QR code.  When purchases are completed, the order is delivered to shoppers’ homes shortly after they get home from work.
The Tesco app was downloaded 400,000 times in one month after the launch and Tesco skyrocketed to number one in online sales in Korea.


(via Saul Berman blog, When trying to find innovation, look for the intersection of the physical and digital worlds — Tech News and Analysis)

ibmsocialbiz:

Seeking innovation? Look for the intersection of physical and digital worlds.

Take, for example, Tesco supermarkets in South Korea.  The company wanted to increase sales without creating more stores.  Tesco understood that Koreans work long hours and have little appetite for shopping at the end of the day so they created virtual grocery stores at subway stations.  These virtual stores, shelves and all, are projected on the walls of subway stations.  To purchase items, shoppers simply go to a Tesco app on a smartphone and scan the projected items’ QR code.  When purchases are completed, the order is delivered to shoppers’ homes shortly after they get home from work.

The Tesco app was downloaded 400,000 times in one month after the launch and Tesco skyrocketed to number one in online sales in Korea.

(via Saul Berman blog, When trying to find innovation, look for the intersection of the physical and digital worlds — Tech News and Analysis)

(via smarterplanet)

smarterplanet:

GLASS ACT

Background: Nature recently published a paper on a new technology for windows. In a nutshell: glass has been prepared that selectively absorbs visible and near-infrared light when an electrochemical voltage is applied. This opens the way to ‘smart’ windows that block heat on demand, with or without optical transparency.

Given that residential and commercial buildings account for about 40 percent of energy use and 30 percent of energy-related carbon emissions in the US, this is quite a breakthrough.

Read Composite for smarter windows  (Note: Nature subscription required for this one)

Design challenge: Our goal was to create a graphic that simply and elegantly showed the three limiting optical states of a new smart coating: (a) full transparency, (b) selectively near-infrared (NIR) blocking, and (c) darkened against both visible and NIR light transmission (as labelled in the final graphic, above).

The cover design (also above) showed the three states in one window, but for the graphic we wanted to be more explanatory while still conveying the simplicity of the concept.

A key challenge was to show the layers within the glass, to visually explain how applying a charge to this setup affects the nanocrystals and therefore the optical transparency of the glass matrix. It was drawn in an orthographic projection, with the layered structure of the glass drawn as blowouts using the same projection. This allowed all of the elements to sit nicely within the same visual space.

I experimented by showing more structure around the windows (such as in a brick wall) and by showing more of an external ‘scene’, but found that simple floating windows with a stylized depiction of sky and natural light was all that was needed.

-Nik Spencer

(Source: naturegraphics)

smartercities:

How doctors tapped into cloud to promote better health in Haiti

Post 2010 earthquake in Haiti, two American doctors created a humanitarian, non-profit program named Colleagues In Care in an effort to provide education and training to those who were affected by the earthquake.

Free advice to BlackBerry

Dear BlackBerry,

You have one hand left to play, but I doubt you will play it, because you are living in a tunnel.

That play is adopt the Android OS and give all BB10 devices the ability to run Android. 

Salvage what’s left of the name by making a transition to Android immediately. Only then will people be tempted to try your devices.

Perhaps adopting someone else’s OS was always too hard of a paradigm shift  to make for old executives that were out of touch with what consumers need.

It is pretty evident that your current thinking can’t save the once might company.

PS Congrats  on your latest achievement of laying off 4500 people.

LG Ultra HD 84” TV Commercial (METEOR EXPLODES DURING JOB INTERVIEW)

How mobile phones are making cash obsolete in Africa
GEOFFREY YORK, theglobeandmail.com

When he rolls into a gas sta­tion to fill his tank, Barkhad Dahir doesn’t get out of his car. He punch­es a few but­tons on his cell­phone and with­in sec­onds he has paid for the fuel.

With the same quick key­strokes on his phone, he pays for…

How mobile phones are making cash obsolete in Africa
GEOFFREY YORK, theglobeandmail.com

When he rolls into a gas sta­tion to fill his tank, Barkhad Dahir doesn’t get out of his car. He punch­es a few but­tons on his cell­phone and with­in sec­onds he has paid for the fuel.

With the same quick key­strokes on his phone, he pays for…

smarterplanet:

Stadium App Lets Fans Order Food And Get On-Court Close Ups - PSFK
Although this app will encourage people to stare at their phones at a live event, it’s still an ingenious intersection of the home and live experiences.
“The home of the Brooklyn Nets released the Barclays Center app in an attempt to merge the best of the stadium experience with the technological benefits of watching the game from home.
The Barclays Center app, which is iOS and Android compatible, is a new event app that allows spectators to interact with live in-game footage and other arena features. The app, which connects through the arena’s public Wi-Fi and is powered by Cisco’s StadiumVision Mobile technology, provides fans the ability to access live, in-game video, the official television feed, a 30-second rewind feature for replays, and up to four different cameras – mixing TV angles and GoPros mounted around the arena.
Incredibly, the app also lets users order food from their seat, send messages for display on the scoreboard, check-in, and interact with other users. The StadiumVision Mobile technology provides a nearly seamless stream of action to your phone at only a two second delay.”

Tech

smarterplanet:

Stadium App Lets Fans Order Food And Get On-Court Close Ups - PSFK

Although this app will encourage people to stare at their phones at a live event, it’s still an ingenious intersection of the home and live experiences.

“The home of the Brooklyn Nets released the Barclays Center app in an attempt to merge the best of the stadium experience with the technological benefits of watching the game from home.

The Barclays Center app, which is iOS and Android compatible, is a new event app that allows spectators to interact with live in-game footage and other arena features. The app, which connects through the arena’s public Wi-Fi and is powered by Cisco’s StadiumVision Mobile technology, provides fans the ability to access live, in-game video, the official television feed, a 30-second rewind feature for replays, and up to four different cameras – mixing TV angles and GoPros mounted around the arena.

Incredibly, the app also lets users order food from their seat, send messages for display on the scoreboard, check-in, and interact with other users. The StadiumVision Mobile technology provides a nearly seamless stream of action to your phone at only a two second delay.”

Tech

Brainstorming at 30K feet: Reflections from the ‘hackathon in the sky’
christinafarr, venturebeat.com

[Full dis­clo­sure: British Air­ways paid for my flight, allow­ing me to par­tic­i­pate in this project.]

30,000 above the Atlantic Ocean, entre­pre­neurs on a char­tered flight to Lon­don worked furi­ous­ly to solve one of the world’s most…

Brainstorming at 30K feet: Reflections from the ‘hackathon in the sky’
christinafarr, venturebeat.com

[Full dis­clo­sure: British Air­ways paid for my flight, allow­ing me to par­tic­i­pate in this project.]

30,000 above the Atlantic Ocean, entre­pre­neurs on a char­tered flight to Lon­don worked furi­ous­ly to solve one of the world’s most…