the doctor is in.

crowdcurator:

Blink
Blink is simply too good to be true. And while it’s not unusual for a crowd funded product to make enormous claims and under deliver, Blink earns a feature just because we want so desperately for it to deliver on what it promises.
Blink is a wireless home security system that has some serious appeal to it. It will ultimately provide live HD video streaming, temperature sensors, night vision, motion detection and more, and all without a monthly fee. But it’s the supposed 1 year battery life that’s raising the most eye brows in the comments section.
No firm answers on Nest or HomeKit support, but the creators talk of IFTTT integration after launch.
Back on Kickstarter

crowdcurator:

Blink

Blink is simply too good to be true. And while it’s not unusual for a crowd funded product to make enormous claims and under deliver, Blink earns a feature just because we want so desperately for it to deliver on what it promises.

Blink is a wireless home security system that has some serious appeal to it. It will ultimately provide live HD video streaming, temperature sensors, night vision, motion detection and more, and all without a monthly fee. But it’s the supposed 1 year battery life that’s raising the most eye brows in the comments section.

No firm answers on Nest or HomeKit support, but the creators talk of IFTTT integration after launch.

Back on Kickstarter

(via smarterplanet)

ibmsocialbiz:

Seeking innovation? Look for the intersection of physical and digital worlds.

Take, for example, Tesco supermarkets in South Korea.  The company wanted to increase sales without creating more stores.  Tesco understood that Koreans work long hours and have little appetite for shopping at the end of the day so they created virtual grocery stores at subway stations.  These virtual stores, shelves and all, are projected on the walls of subway stations.  To purchase items, shoppers simply go to a Tesco app on a smartphone and scan the projected items’ QR code.  When purchases are completed, the order is delivered to shoppers’ homes shortly after they get home from work.
The Tesco app was downloaded 400,000 times in one month after the launch and Tesco skyrocketed to number one in online sales in Korea.


(via Saul Berman blog, When trying to find innovation, look for the intersection of the physical and digital worlds — Tech News and Analysis)

ibmsocialbiz:

Seeking innovation? Look for the intersection of physical and digital worlds.

Take, for example, Tesco supermarkets in South Korea.  The company wanted to increase sales without creating more stores.  Tesco understood that Koreans work long hours and have little appetite for shopping at the end of the day so they created virtual grocery stores at subway stations.  These virtual stores, shelves and all, are projected on the walls of subway stations.  To purchase items, shoppers simply go to a Tesco app on a smartphone and scan the projected items’ QR code.  When purchases are completed, the order is delivered to shoppers’ homes shortly after they get home from work.

The Tesco app was downloaded 400,000 times in one month after the launch and Tesco skyrocketed to number one in online sales in Korea.

(via Saul Berman blog, When trying to find innovation, look for the intersection of the physical and digital worlds — Tech News and Analysis)

(via smarterplanet)

smarterplanet:

GLASS ACT

Background: Nature recently published a paper on a new technology for windows. In a nutshell: glass has been prepared that selectively absorbs visible and near-infrared light when an electrochemical voltage is applied. This opens the way to ‘smart’ windows that block heat on demand, with or without optical transparency.

Given that residential and commercial buildings account for about 40 percent of energy use and 30 percent of energy-related carbon emissions in the US, this is quite a breakthrough.

Read Composite for smarter windows  (Note: Nature subscription required for this one)

Design challenge: Our goal was to create a graphic that simply and elegantly showed the three limiting optical states of a new smart coating: (a) full transparency, (b) selectively near-infrared (NIR) blocking, and (c) darkened against both visible and NIR light transmission (as labelled in the final graphic, above).

The cover design (also above) showed the three states in one window, but for the graphic we wanted to be more explanatory while still conveying the simplicity of the concept.

A key challenge was to show the layers within the glass, to visually explain how applying a charge to this setup affects the nanocrystals and therefore the optical transparency of the glass matrix. It was drawn in an orthographic projection, with the layered structure of the glass drawn as blowouts using the same projection. This allowed all of the elements to sit nicely within the same visual space.

I experimented by showing more structure around the windows (such as in a brick wall) and by showing more of an external ‘scene’, but found that simple floating windows with a stylized depiction of sky and natural light was all that was needed.

-Nik Spencer

(Source: naturegraphics)

smartercities:

How doctors tapped into cloud to promote better health in Haiti

Post 2010 earthquake in Haiti, two American doctors created a humanitarian, non-profit program named Colleagues In Care in an effort to provide education and training to those who were affected by the earthquake.

Free advice to BlackBerry

Dear BlackBerry,

You have one hand left to play, but I doubt you will play it, because you are living in a tunnel.

That play is adopt the Android OS and give all BB10 devices the ability to run Android. 

Salvage what’s left of the name by making a transition to Android immediately. Only then will people be tempted to try your devices.

Perhaps adopting someone else’s OS was always too hard of a paradigm shift  to make for old executives that were out of touch with what consumers need.

It is pretty evident that your current thinking can’t save the once might company.

PS Congrats  on your latest achievement of laying off 4500 people.

LG Ultra HD 84” TV Commercial (METEOR EXPLODES DURING JOB INTERVIEW)